What Is RDP And How Is It Dangerous?

If you have been paying attention to security news lately then you might have heard of a technology that is called RDP. It has been the source of a lot contention in the security community lately. If you haven’t been paying attention then let me try my best to update you. Just recently there was a security bug found in the RDP protocol in several versions of Windows. These versions included Windows XP and the NT line of Windows. While most of these lines of Windows are not used anymore, there are still a lot of businesses which run those operating systems. And these businesses are the ones that could potentially be a victim of this exploit.

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So after the vulnerability was found by the white hacker, he also created a proof of concept attack. This was to show Microsoft and everyone else in the security community how the vulnerability could be used and why it was important to patch it up. The security community and Microsoft took it seriously and steps were taken to fix it. Unfortunately someone in this chain of trust decided to leak out the exploit and Chinese black hat hackers were able to get their hands on it. Now the situation became more serious.

So what is this RDP technology that everyone is scared of?

Well it is a technology whose full name is Remote Desktop Protocol. It allows you to be able to see the desktop of another computer and be able to work on it. RDP is a very useful technology and over the years it has improved so that there are not as many security problems. But as we said earlier in the article, there are still a lot of people running older versions of the operating system that need to be patched up.

The leak of the RDP security vulnerability in older versions of Microsoft Windows is a big problem. If you cannot trust the security chain then it needs to be fixed. Hopefully this is just a case of one bad apple in the bunch and nothing like this will happen again. If it does then there are going to be a lot of people who trust these security vendors and Microsoft looking at them skeptically from now on.

About Lee Munson

Lee's non-technical background allows him to write about internet security in a clear way that is understandable to both IT professionals and people just like you who need simple answers to your security questions.

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