Twaniac.Com And TheSmartECard.Com Go Phishing On Twitter?

Ecard scams and things you would rather not see on Twitter are nothing new and neither will be going away soon either.

Now, however, it would appear that we see the two working in tandem.

from-twitter-with-love

According to @spam, Twitter’s profile that posts about spam and scams, there is an eCard website which they claim is using their service to promote a phishing site.

A couple of recent updates from them advise users of the service not to visit a site called SmartECard.com –

Please make sure you do not visit any site calling itself TheSmartECard.com; it appears to be phishing-related.

Additionally, there is also a new update about a possibly related site, Twaniac.com –

Please also avoid anything related to Twaniac.com as they’re from the people behind TheSmartECard.com

Fortunately, I’ve only had a couple of people who are promoting that website follow me (must have something to do with my Twitter username) but others, such as @davkal, would appear to be somewhat annoyed at the number of spammy followers they are getting right now –

davkal 2 more TheSmartECard spammers down the tubes, 5 this morning so far

I don’t know about you but I certainly won’t be following anyone promoting that website!

About Lee Munson

Lee's non-technical background allows him to write about internet security in a clear way that is understandable to both IT professionals and people just like you who need simple answers to your security questions.

Comments

  1. MOBILE MESSENGER says:

    We at Mobile Messenger would like to assist you with your concern or complaint. If you need assistance in regards to being unsubscribed or other related issues, please do not hesitate to contact us. Please call 1-800-416-6129 Monday to Friday 0600 – 1800 US Pacific Time or email escalationsus@sms-helpdesk.com

    Sandra
    MOBILE MESSENGER

  2. Curiosity i suppose, the thing that amazes me about these spam/scam/phishing sites is no one seems to try and figure out who is profiting from them. Seems like the logical course of action IMO when crap like this pops up is to try and find the source.

  3. I did a little digging of my own and found that if you strip all the javascript with noscript you end up being asked to give your name and email to set up and “account” to view your card, it then asks for a password. You can really put anything you want in these fields, it doesn’t really matter because regardless of what you put in you will end up on a page with a hyperlink that says: “We have located 1 pending ecard(s) matching your name or email address. your friend picked an ecard based on “how smart is your stalker?” Click here to get started. ” When you click the link you will be bounced through w ww.onlyhotpics.com (a carbon copy page) and eventually end up at w ww.mylovercalculator.com, a website actively promoted by the company Mobile Messenger. Mobile Messenger settled a lawsuit in December 2007 for 12 million on claims of unauthorized charges and unfair billing practices, seems they haven’t changed.

    I’m constantly amazed that anyone can fall for these scams, and even more so amazed that allegedly “reputable” companies can operate using these marketing tactics and not be fined and/or shut down.

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