Microsoft Get Alleged Australian Xbox 720 Hacker With Possible FBI Help

With Sony announcing their new PlayStation 4 yesterday it is perhaps unsurprising that Microsoft will not be too far behind with a competitor – the Xbox 720. Up until the point, secrecy surrounding the new console will be paramount. Unless, of course, someone starts leaking details. Allegedly.

Xbox-720-hacker

And that is exactly what has happened, reportedly, via a tech leaker known as SuperDaE, aka Dan Henry.

Henry is believed to have gathered and leaked intel about both the new console and the Durango development kit according to Microsoft, leading to talks between both parties taking place via the company’s Anti-Piracy and Confidential Information Management team. Shortly after these talks collapsed Henry received an unpleasant surprise –

Seven – eight law enforcement agents had turned up to confiscate all the hard drives and computer equipment they could find at his home. The complaints files against hime were misuse of a computer and multiple cases of unauthorised server access. The complaints were levied by Microsoft, PayPal, eBay, Blizzard, Valve, Epic Games and Sony.

With PayPal and eBay being involved it is likely that all this came about following SuperDaE’s attempt to sell the development kit on the online auction site last year.

What may be most surprising here though is the fact that the Australian police had some outside help –

Thats right, the FBI were also involved in exectuing a search warrant on an Australian home – gotta love this new world without borders eh?

“The FBI agent told me they’re trying to seek a loophole to extradite me. They can’t extradite me straight up but they’re looking for those loopholes to do it,” Henry says. A trial to extradite him would turn him into the Kim Dotcom of the gaming world. Already he’s trying to get up a Twitter campaign he’s calling#freesuperdae.
Gizmodo

Whether Henry (not likely his real name) gets convicted for his alleged offences remains to be seen but the charges do carry some pretty hefty jail time, up to and including life, which seems somewhat disproportionate when you consider the leniency given to many murderers and rapists these days.

photo: Ciaran McGuiggan

About Lee Munson

Lee's non-technical background allows him to write about internet security in a clear way that is understandable to both IT professionals and people just like you who need simple answers to your security questions.

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