How Can I Keep My Kids Safe By Using Parental Controls In Windows 7?

As a parent the first duty that you have to your children is to keep them safe.

You do this when they first learn to go outside by themselves and you do this when they are first learning how to use sharp utensils.

You must also be able to do this when they are starting to explore the world of the internet by themselves for the first time.

There are many dangers that exist on the world of the internet and your kids can quickly be caught up in it if you are not careful.

There are a few software programs that are out on the market right now that will help keep your kids safe while they are on the computer.

But going out and buying extra software to help protect your kids might be a little bit of overkill when you have Windows 7 running on your machine. (I’ve also written a similar post on parental controls for Windows Vista)

There are a few features that are built in to Windows 7 that will help you keep your child protected while they are on the internet.

I will give you a few of the parental controls that you can use to help keep your child safe online.

The very first thing that you want to do to your computer and is the easiest way that you will be able to control the computer for younger children, is to set up a log in password.

Most kids have not figured out the art of breaking into their parent’s computer.

So if you make sure that your system is set to need a username and password to log on then you have accomplished the first step of keeping your child safe on the computer.

This way they are only able to get on the computer when you allow them to.

The first step in keeping them protected is to make sure that you know when they are on the computer at all times.

The second thing that you need to set when it comes to protecting your child on the internet is to limit the time that they are allowed to use the computer.

Windows 7 has a setting that will allow you to do exactly that.

If they are only on the computer for certain hours of the day, then you know that there is a good chance that they will be safe.

Another setting that you can use to protect your kids is the blocking of certain programs setting.

When a kid is able to surf the internet freely, they will download programs from anywhere.

The last thing that is on their mind is the security risk that they may be under.

If the program looks cool then they will try to download it.

The same thing applies with music, movies and any other file formats that are out there.

To prevent this from happening, you can block your kids from using certain programs.

If you have Kazaa or any other file sharing program on your computer then you can block them from using it.

A policy like that will keep them and your computer safe.

Setting up the right parental controls on Windows 7 will help your child stay safe on the internet.

Read more on Windows 7 Security

About Lee Munson

Lee's non-technical background allows him to write about internet security in a clear way that is understandable to both IT professionals and people just like you who need simple answers to your security questions.

Comments

  1. Ben Beck says:

    Teens will be teens!

    I’ve seen TONS of websites and blog posts that describe how to get around Win7/Vista Parental Controls via proxy tunnels, and more.

    If you have a teen that is even somewhat computer savvy, I think you’ll need to get extra protection software, like Net Nanny.

    • You make a good point Ben – parental controls are better suited to younger kids as most teens know more about computers than their parents do!

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